theForum is run by the charity Unlock. We do not actively moderate, monitor or edit contributions but we may intervene and take any action as we think necessary. Further details can be found in our terms of use. If you have any concerns over the contents on our site, please either register those concerns using the report-a-post button or email us at forum@unlock.org.uk.


Mistakes of the Past


Mistakes of the Past

Author
Message
Harmless
Harmless
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 52, Visits: 150
Thorswrath - 17 Sep 18 8:40 AM
Harmless - 16 Sep 18 10:25 PM
Thorswrath - 16 Sep 18 9:11 PM
Harmless - 16 Sep 18 5:45 PM
Thorswrath - 30 Apr 18 8:12 PM
Airlane - 30 Apr 18 12:26 PM
Does anyone out there have positive experiences with employers who state they will take ex-offenders? I've tried the prominent firms such as Virgin and Timpson but they rule out anyone with the letters SO after his name.


Well i'm only in employment because i go for jobs where they don't ask about previous or unspent convictions. I am not surprised that Timpson or Virgin don't take on SO's, i guess it may depend also on the type and severity of the crime which afforded the individual that label. However in my experience of trying to 'do the right thing' by going down the traditional route of employment and telling employers about my conviction, it amounts to nothing but set backs and rejections and it gets to the point where you have to start thinking about your own safety since you are someone who not only is divulging these details but providing them with your home address, e-mail address, phone number and you don't know who you are giving this information out to.

I wouldn't bother with recruitment agencies either, been there, tried it and failed. They will always tell you that having an unspent conviction won't be a barrier but it is. You can't really get any worse employability status in the job market than being an RSO.

If you have only just started looking for work then its going to be a long and arduous task...but not impossible. You need to find a way to get infront of the actual decision makers, not HR departments of big firms. If you find work where they don't ask about unspent convictions then you have to learn quickly how to be the 'grey man' and not get too close to people but close enough so you are socialble and polite at work. My rule these days is to never socialise outside of work with anyone i work with because there is too much at stake.

It all comes down to perseverence, how much rejection can you handle and still keep going? I even got a days work once with an agency in a parcel sorting depot slap bang in the middle of an industrial estate and the following day i stupidly told the recruiter i had an unspent conviction and what it was for, i was then told not to come in and further to that, was not paid for the work i done. When i asked him about it he said, 'i don't give a f##k, take me to court' this was from a big recruitment firm which i wont divulge the details on here. 

You will learn eventually what works and what doesn't.



Actually as an RSO, employment is an area where I've had no difficulty.

I was a self-employed consultant beforehand and then went back to being one after too.

Right after jail, I went to the job centre, was set up working for The Range (DIY type store), and my social worker was delighted.

I guess you just have to keep your mouth shut and roll with the new economy.

Well you are extremely lucky then. I remember my time at the pit of despair..sorry i mean job centre and i remember being told by one person that because i was MAPPA that basically 'you had better find something self employed as no one would employ you' i guess it depends on who you actually talk to, my local job centre was woefully ill equipped to deal with people who had unspent convictions, one guy even went away from his desk to try and find some piece of paper which had details of places that employ ex offenders, it was so out of date and it took him about half an hour to find it.

I agree, you have to basically keep your mouth shut when possible and just get on with it. I am very surprised you got a job that quick


I should add that I never mentioned the conviction even to the job centre. Rather, I got out of jail, was housed, and then set up on JSA by the housing\welfare folk, in the space of a day.

Job Centre put me on a work trial at The Range, with guaranteed interview at the end (should I complete the trial).

The solution I find is to just brazen it out and live as though you have no convictions.

Tweak the spelling of your name if it's in the papers.

If you get any kind of early release or time off for remand, put in an appearance among all your connections as soon as possible, so they remember seeing you at large during the time the papers say you were inside.

Don't rely on the job centre to find you work. Just write a decent CV and apply to businesses about town. 


It's good that you found employment however, a word of caution about 'brazening it out' i've had a lot of experience finding work with an unspent conviction and fair enough if it is only a short term placement whilst you get things in order you may get away with that approach. The problem is when PPU start getting involved, they will ask things like 'does the place you work know you have an unspent conviction' now if on their application form they ask directly and you have omitted that information, it would go down against you as being dishonest and you would also be committing an offence. Now if they don't ask then you are under no obligation to say and generally the PPU and probation are OK with that because those kind of roles tend to not involve much or any contact with the general public.

I'm just saying it's wise to be aware of potential consequences. I personally wouldn't take up a role in a public facing job, at least not where i live anyway due to the fact i know a lot of people having lived in my area all my life and if someone spotted me working at somewhere like a big supermarket i wouldn't put it past some people to go up to the manager and have a little word. This kind of thing has been known to happen before, in fact something similar happened to one of the gentleman in the ISOTP group i attended. Someone actually phoned up his place of work to tell them 'you have a convicted sex offender working for you' needless to say he lost his job after that phone call, and he was working in an office based role, i don't think he ever found out who it was.

I'll tell you a story! While I was working at The Range, someone actually phoned up the police\parole, and told them I was working there. They basically grassed me up to parole as though I were breaking parole. 

And that right there is an attitude I will never understand: " Ring ring! Hello police! I just spotted an ex-con stacking shelves, going straight, smiling and helping people! Isn't he supposed to be stalking children outside a playground? "  The more normal you are the more freaked out they are.

The police never interfered because they openly say they want me to work: "when you're working you're not offending".
Come to think of it the offender managing cops are the most reasonable part of my experience.

I have considered moving from Scotland to London. They cut more corners there allegedly. E.g. a chap I know who dropped out of my college and just walked straight into an IT\programming job there by showing them some of his work. City air makes free, as the Germans say.

The cops don't interrogate me much about work as I baffle them from the outset - I just say I'm abridging a book for some public figure, which is true (I'm finished at The Range - that was xmas work). Once I finish, I'll have my name in a book published during a time when papers say I was in jail (early release), providing a lifelong alibi (couldn't have been in jail). 


Edited
3 Months Ago by Harmless
Thorswrath
Thorswrath
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 38, Visits: 897
Harmless - 16 Sep 18 10:25 PM
Thorswrath - 16 Sep 18 9:11 PM
Harmless - 16 Sep 18 5:45 PM
Thorswrath - 30 Apr 18 8:12 PM
Airlane - 30 Apr 18 12:26 PM
Does anyone out there have positive experiences with employers who state they will take ex-offenders? I've tried the prominent firms such as Virgin and Timpson but they rule out anyone with the letters SO after his name.


Well i'm only in employment because i go for jobs where they don't ask about previous or unspent convictions. I am not surprised that Timpson or Virgin don't take on SO's, i guess it may depend also on the type and severity of the crime which afforded the individual that label. However in my experience of trying to 'do the right thing' by going down the traditional route of employment and telling employers about my conviction, it amounts to nothing but set backs and rejections and it gets to the point where you have to start thinking about your own safety since you are someone who not only is divulging these details but providing them with your home address, e-mail address, phone number and you don't know who you are giving this information out to.

I wouldn't bother with recruitment agencies either, been there, tried it and failed. They will always tell you that having an unspent conviction won't be a barrier but it is. You can't really get any worse employability status in the job market than being an RSO.

If you have only just started looking for work then its going to be a long and arduous task...but not impossible. You need to find a way to get infront of the actual decision makers, not HR departments of big firms. If you find work where they don't ask about unspent convictions then you have to learn quickly how to be the 'grey man' and not get too close to people but close enough so you are socialble and polite at work. My rule these days is to never socialise outside of work with anyone i work with because there is too much at stake.

It all comes down to perseverence, how much rejection can you handle and still keep going? I even got a days work once with an agency in a parcel sorting depot slap bang in the middle of an industrial estate and the following day i stupidly told the recruiter i had an unspent conviction and what it was for, i was then told not to come in and further to that, was not paid for the work i done. When i asked him about it he said, 'i don't give a f##k, take me to court' this was from a big recruitment firm which i wont divulge the details on here. 

You will learn eventually what works and what doesn't.



Actually as an RSO, employment is an area where I've had no difficulty.

I was a self-employed consultant beforehand and then went back to being one after too.

Right after jail, I went to the job centre, was set up working for The Range (DIY type store), and my social worker was delighted.

I guess you just have to keep your mouth shut and roll with the new economy.

Well you are extremely lucky then. I remember my time at the pit of despair..sorry i mean job centre and i remember being told by one person that because i was MAPPA that basically 'you had better find something self employed as no one would employ you' i guess it depends on who you actually talk to, my local job centre was woefully ill equipped to deal with people who had unspent convictions, one guy even went away from his desk to try and find some piece of paper which had details of places that employ ex offenders, it was so out of date and it took him about half an hour to find it.

I agree, you have to basically keep your mouth shut when possible and just get on with it. I am very surprised you got a job that quick


I should add that I never mentioned the conviction even to the job centre. Rather, I got out of jail, was housed, and then set up on JSA by the housing\welfare folk, in the space of a day.

Job Centre put me on a work trial at The Range, with guaranteed interview at the end (should I complete the trial).

The solution I find is to just brazen it out and live as though you have no convictions.

Tweak the spelling of your name if it's in the papers.

If you get any kind of early release or time off for remand, put in an appearance among all your connections as soon as possible, so they remember seeing you at large during the time the papers say you were inside.

Don't rely on the job centre to find you work. Just write a decent CV and apply to businesses about town. 


It's good that you found employment however, a word of caution about 'brazening it out' i've had a lot of experience finding work with an unspent conviction and fair enough if it is only a short term placement whilst you get things in order you may get away with that approach. The problem is when PPU start getting involved, they will ask things like 'does the place you work know you have an unspent conviction' now if on their application form they ask directly and you have omitted that information, it would go down against you as being dishonest and you would also be committing an offence. Now if they don't ask then you are under no obligation to say and generally the PPU and probation are OK with that because those kind of roles tend to not involve much or any contact with the general public.

I'm just saying it's wise to be aware of potential consequences. I personally wouldn't take up a role in a public facing job, at least not where i live anyway due to the fact i know a lot of people having lived in my area all my life and if someone spotted me working at somewhere like a big supermarket i wouldn't put it past some people to go up to the manager and have a little word. This kind of thing has been known to happen before, in fact something similar happened to one of the gentleman in the ISOTP group i attended. Someone actually phoned up his place of work to tell them 'you have a convicted sex offender working for you' needless to say he lost his job after that phone call, and he was working in an office based role, i don't think he ever found out who it was.

Harmless
Harmless
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 52, Visits: 150
Thorswrath - 16 Sep 18 9:11 PM
Harmless - 16 Sep 18 5:45 PM
Thorswrath - 30 Apr 18 8:12 PM
Airlane - 30 Apr 18 12:26 PM
Does anyone out there have positive experiences with employers who state they will take ex-offenders? I've tried the prominent firms such as Virgin and Timpson but they rule out anyone with the letters SO after his name.


Well i'm only in employment because i go for jobs where they don't ask about previous or unspent convictions. I am not surprised that Timpson or Virgin don't take on SO's, i guess it may depend also on the type and severity of the crime which afforded the individual that label. However in my experience of trying to 'do the right thing' by going down the traditional route of employment and telling employers about my conviction, it amounts to nothing but set backs and rejections and it gets to the point where you have to start thinking about your own safety since you are someone who not only is divulging these details but providing them with your home address, e-mail address, phone number and you don't know who you are giving this information out to.

I wouldn't bother with recruitment agencies either, been there, tried it and failed. They will always tell you that having an unspent conviction won't be a barrier but it is. You can't really get any worse employability status in the job market than being an RSO.

If you have only just started looking for work then its going to be a long and arduous task...but not impossible. You need to find a way to get infront of the actual decision makers, not HR departments of big firms. If you find work where they don't ask about unspent convictions then you have to learn quickly how to be the 'grey man' and not get too close to people but close enough so you are socialble and polite at work. My rule these days is to never socialise outside of work with anyone i work with because there is too much at stake.

It all comes down to perseverence, how much rejection can you handle and still keep going? I even got a days work once with an agency in a parcel sorting depot slap bang in the middle of an industrial estate and the following day i stupidly told the recruiter i had an unspent conviction and what it was for, i was then told not to come in and further to that, was not paid for the work i done. When i asked him about it he said, 'i don't give a f##k, take me to court' this was from a big recruitment firm which i wont divulge the details on here. 

You will learn eventually what works and what doesn't.



Actually as an RSO, employment is an area where I've had no difficulty.

I was a self-employed consultant beforehand and then went back to being one after too.

Right after jail, I went to the job centre, was set up working for The Range (DIY type store), and my social worker was delighted.

I guess you just have to keep your mouth shut and roll with the new economy.

Well you are extremely lucky then. I remember my time at the pit of despair..sorry i mean job centre and i remember being told by one person that because i was MAPPA that basically 'you had better find something self employed as no one would employ you' i guess it depends on who you actually talk to, my local job centre was woefully ill equipped to deal with people who had unspent convictions, one guy even went away from his desk to try and find some piece of paper which had details of places that employ ex offenders, it was so out of date and it took him about half an hour to find it.

I agree, you have to basically keep your mouth shut when possible and just get on with it. I am very surprised you got a job that quick


I should add that I never mentioned the conviction even to the job centre. Rather, I got out of jail, was housed, and then set up on JSA by the housing\welfare folk, in the space of a day.

Job Centre put me on a work trial at The Range, with guaranteed interview at the end (should I complete the trial).

The solution I find is to just brazen it out and live as though you have no convictions.

Tweak the spelling of your name if it's in the papers.

If you get any kind of early release or time off for remand, put in an appearance among all your connections as soon as possible, so they remember seeing you at large during the time the papers say you were inside.

Don't rely on the job centre to find you work. Just write a decent CV and apply to businesses about town. 


Edited
3 Months Ago by Harmless
Thorswrath
Thorswrath
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)Supreme Being (1.1K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 38, Visits: 897
Harmless - 16 Sep 18 5:45 PM
Thorswrath - 30 Apr 18 8:12 PM
Airlane - 30 Apr 18 12:26 PM
Does anyone out there have positive experiences with employers who state they will take ex-offenders? I've tried the prominent firms such as Virgin and Timpson but they rule out anyone with the letters SO after his name.


Well i'm only in employment because i go for jobs where they don't ask about previous or unspent convictions. I am not surprised that Timpson or Virgin don't take on SO's, i guess it may depend also on the type and severity of the crime which afforded the individual that label. However in my experience of trying to 'do the right thing' by going down the traditional route of employment and telling employers about my conviction, it amounts to nothing but set backs and rejections and it gets to the point where you have to start thinking about your own safety since you are someone who not only is divulging these details but providing them with your home address, e-mail address, phone number and you don't know who you are giving this information out to.

I wouldn't bother with recruitment agencies either, been there, tried it and failed. They will always tell you that having an unspent conviction won't be a barrier but it is. You can't really get any worse employability status in the job market than being an RSO.

If you have only just started looking for work then its going to be a long and arduous task...but not impossible. You need to find a way to get infront of the actual decision makers, not HR departments of big firms. If you find work where they don't ask about unspent convictions then you have to learn quickly how to be the 'grey man' and not get too close to people but close enough so you are socialble and polite at work. My rule these days is to never socialise outside of work with anyone i work with because there is too much at stake.

It all comes down to perseverence, how much rejection can you handle and still keep going? I even got a days work once with an agency in a parcel sorting depot slap bang in the middle of an industrial estate and the following day i stupidly told the recruiter i had an unspent conviction and what it was for, i was then told not to come in and further to that, was not paid for the work i done. When i asked him about it he said, 'i don't give a f##k, take me to court' this was from a big recruitment firm which i wont divulge the details on here. 

You will learn eventually what works and what doesn't.



Actually as an RSO, employment is an area where I've had no difficulty.

I was a self-employed consultant beforehand and then went back to being one after too.

Right after jail, I went to the job centre, was set up working for The Range (DIY type store), and my social worker was delighted.

I guess you just have to keep your mouth shut and roll with the new economy.

Well you are extremely lucky then. I remember my time at the pit of despair..sorry i mean job centre and i remember being told by one person that because i was MAPPA that basically 'you had better find something self employed as no one would employ you' i guess it depends on who you actually talk to, my local job centre was woefully ill equipped to deal with people who had unspent convictions, one guy even went away from his desk to try and find some piece of paper which had details of places that employ ex offenders, it was so out of date and it took him about half an hour to find it.

I agree, you have to basically keep your mouth shut when possible and just get on with it. I am very surprised you got a job that quick


Harmless
Harmless
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 52, Visits: 150
AB2014 - 3 May 18 1:09 PM
Diogenese - 1 May 18 10:27 PM
Certain types of organisations such as universities do ask about unspent convictions because they have a duty of care to the students. However, what seems to happen is that the information is assessed by the HR department and not shared with the actual recruiter. This means that any questions will have been asked and answered prior to an interview.

This arrangement has huge benefits to those with a criminal record to disclose as they can attend an interview free from the worry of any disclosure at that point and should they be offered the post, their criminal record will not be a matter for public consumption but remains firmly with the HR department.

I would imagine there are some exceptions to this, depending on the nature of the conviction but this certainly opens up opportunities.

I think the best practice for universities and colleges is to look at relevant unspent convictions, rather than all unspent convictions, so many should be ignored as a matter of procedure. If the course involves a work placement with vulnerable people, then it's a matter of filtering anyway.

I don't know what the point is in criminal records.

If you robbed a bank, and then went to jail, then got out again...thereafter you should either be free enough to work in a bank, or else you belong in jail.

Anything in between is farcical. Show me the person who's safe enough to be out of jail, but too dangerous to work in a bank in case they rob it. 

I cannot imagine this person.

Same goes for child molesters etc. "Walk free but keep away from schools?" Do you think a prospective child rapist won't walk the extra 10 minutes to commit his crime? If you have to keep away from schools you have no business walking free. What kind of spontaneity would one have to have to commit a crime that opportunistically? If you're that deranged, that people have to worry about you in that degree of detail, you should be in jail.

Edited
3 Months Ago by Harmless
Harmless
Harmless
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)Supreme Being (793 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 52, Visits: 150
Thorswrath - 30 Apr 18 8:12 PM
Airlane - 30 Apr 18 12:26 PM
Does anyone out there have positive experiences with employers who state they will take ex-offenders? I've tried the prominent firms such as Virgin and Timpson but they rule out anyone with the letters SO after his name.


Well i'm only in employment because i go for jobs where they don't ask about previous or unspent convictions. I am not surprised that Timpson or Virgin don't take on SO's, i guess it may depend also on the type and severity of the crime which afforded the individual that label. However in my experience of trying to 'do the right thing' by going down the traditional route of employment and telling employers about my conviction, it amounts to nothing but set backs and rejections and it gets to the point where you have to start thinking about your own safety since you are someone who not only is divulging these details but providing them with your home address, e-mail address, phone number and you don't know who you are giving this information out to.

I wouldn't bother with recruitment agencies either, been there, tried it and failed. They will always tell you that having an unspent conviction won't be a barrier but it is. You can't really get any worse employability status in the job market than being an RSO.

If you have only just started looking for work then its going to be a long and arduous task...but not impossible. You need to find a way to get infront of the actual decision makers, not HR departments of big firms. If you find work where they don't ask about unspent convictions then you have to learn quickly how to be the 'grey man' and not get too close to people but close enough so you are socialble and polite at work. My rule these days is to never socialise outside of work with anyone i work with because there is too much at stake.

It all comes down to perseverence, how much rejection can you handle and still keep going? I even got a days work once with an agency in a parcel sorting depot slap bang in the middle of an industrial estate and the following day i stupidly told the recruiter i had an unspent conviction and what it was for, i was then told not to come in and further to that, was not paid for the work i done. When i asked him about it he said, 'i don't give a f##k, take me to court' this was from a big recruitment firm which i wont divulge the details on here. 

You will learn eventually what works and what doesn't.



Actually as an RSO, employment is an area where I've had no difficulty.

I was a self-employed consultant beforehand and then went back to being one after too.

Right after jail, I went to the job centre, was set up working for The Range (DIY type store), and my social worker was delighted.

I guess you just have to keep your mouth shut and roll with the new economy.
AB2014
AB2014
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 269, Visits: 1.8K
AB2014 - 3 May 18 1:09 PM
Diogenese - 1 May 18 10:27 PM
Certain types of organisations such as universities do ask about unspent convictions because they have a duty of care to the students. However, what seems to happen is that the information is assessed by the HR department and not shared with the actual recruiter. This means that any questions will have been asked and answered prior to an interview.

This arrangement has huge benefits to those with a criminal record to disclose as they can attend an interview free from the worry of any disclosure at that point and should they be offered the post, their criminal record will not be a matter for public consumption but remains firmly with the HR department.

I would imagine there are some exceptions to this, depending on the nature of the conviction but this certainly opens up opportunities.

I think the best practice for universities and colleges is to look at relevant unspent convictions, rather than all unspent convictions, so many should be ignored as a matter of procedure. If the course involves a work placement with vulnerable people, then it's a matter of filtering anyway.

On the subject of universities, Unlock's campaigning has helped lead to UCAS changing their application process relating to criminal records. Another barrier out of the way.
K-NW
K-NW
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)Supreme Being (214 reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 6, Visits: 4
Thorswrath - 29 Apr 18 1:10 PM
I was lucky to avoid prison, but i know people who have been inside, one person i know said it was the most miserable and depressing time of his life, he went to a cat B and another person i know went to a cat C open prison where he said it wasn't great but it was a bit more comfortable than he expected, i imagine mainly down to the fact he made good friends with his room mate and i reckon that's half the battle, trying to fit in or not stand out. 

I think the public are referring to cat C open prisons when they say 'everyone gets playstations and TV's ' but even there you don't get any of that stuff as far as i know my pal only had a radio and some of his personal music collection.

There is not enough media attention given to successful rehabilitation so the public is ill informed about what is actually possible. I've seen people who were really in a bad way with drugs manage to turn their lives around (myself included) but do you hear about their struggles and successes in the news ? not unless it's a celebrity. I've sat infront of employers before and tried to talk to them about how i've dealt with my own behaviour by getting help but in most cases all they hear is 'criminal' blah blah blah 'offender' blah blah blah 'excuses' blah blah blah.

I agree with the OP, that rehabilitation in a practical sense is not yet really understood other than by very well educated and practiced professionals. There is no national recognised standard of rehabilitation except person A has not committed X offence for X number of years.

I think people need to understand that someone of previous good character can end up making bad mistakes in life, but equally can use the experience to learn and adapt into a better person, there are people who have had a bad deal in life in terms of their social circles and family life, lack of opportunites other than a criminal route who seemingly start out bad from the offset who somehow still manage to find a way out and leave that life behind them. It should be celebrated more often and thus it would be better able to be encouraged.


Hi, I just want to clarify that Cat D is an open prison, Cat C is not open. 
AB2014
AB2014
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)Supreme Being (13K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 269, Visits: 1.8K
Diogenese - 1 May 18 10:27 PM
Certain types of organisations such as universities do ask about unspent convictions because they have a duty of care to the students. However, what seems to happen is that the information is assessed by the HR department and not shared with the actual recruiter. This means that any questions will have been asked and answered prior to an interview.

This arrangement has huge benefits to those with a criminal record to disclose as they can attend an interview free from the worry of any disclosure at that point and should they be offered the post, their criminal record will not be a matter for public consumption but remains firmly with the HR department.

I would imagine there are some exceptions to this, depending on the nature of the conviction but this certainly opens up opportunities.

I think the best practice for universities and colleges is to look at relevant unspent convictions, rather than all unspent convictions, so many should be ignored as a matter of procedure. If the course involves a work placement with vulnerable people, then it's a matter of filtering anyway.
Derek Arnold
Derek Arnold
Supreme Being
Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)Supreme Being (1.3K reputation)

Group: Forum Members
Posts: 20, Visits: 42
Certain types of organisations such as universities do ask about unspent convictions because they have a duty of care to the students. However, what seems to happen is that the information is assessed by the HR department and not shared with the actual recruiter. This means that any questions will have been asked and answered prior to an interview.

This arrangement has huge benefits to those with a criminal record to disclose as they can attend an interview free from the worry of any disclosure at that point and should they be offered the post, their criminal record will not be a matter for public consumption but remains firmly with the HR department.

I would imagine there are some exceptions to this, depending on the nature of the conviction but this certainly opens up opportunities.
GO


Similar Topics


As a small but national charity, we rely on charitable grants and individual donations to continue running theForum. We do not deliver government services. By being independent, we are able to respond to the needs of the people with convictions. Help us keep theForum going.


Login
Existing Account
Email Address:


Password:


Select a Forum....
























































































































































































theForum


Search