theForum

Self Employment


https://forum.unlock.org.uk/Topic13011.aspx

By Mintaka - 14 May 10 10:01 AM

Frankly, I have never understood why anybody would feel happy to spend their working lives making somebody else rich. I assume it must be some sort of hereditary attitude thing like my grandfather was a coal miner, my father is a coal miner, so I am going to be a coal miner, but of course you're not are you? My own father left school at fifteen to become an apprentice at his local electrical firm and he still worked in the same building when he retired decades later. In fact, I still have the cigarette box up in the loft that they gave him in appreciation of his half a century of loyal service.

People constantly witter on about how they are too frightened to work for themselves so they resort the perceived security of employment, but nowadays there is no safety in employment. Ignoring the hazard of zero hour contracts even the most secure job is unlikely to last indefinitely and everyone at some point will face the prospect of being unemployed at some point in their lives.

So why be so afraid of self employment? Ok, some will ditch a 30k salary to become an e-bay trader and then wonder why they are getting behind with the repayments on the Porshe they just bought. Others set up a business with a friend and then promptly fall out. So there are pitfalls, but so there are anywhere in life. You could find out tomorrow you've got cancer.

I stated out when I was fourteen selling bags of firewood to the local corner shops. Now, near retirement age, I still work for myself and I have no plans to stop.

To all those wondering if they should try the being your own boss route: stop watching Homes under the Hammer and dreaming. It might work or it might fail. Just get on with it!


Who said life was going to be easy?

By Mintaka - 14 May 10 10:01 AM

Q3 said...
Nothing wrong with Homes Under The Hammer ! - Some of the richest people I know buy and sell houses.
I get your point Mintaka, but people like the word SAFE.
I would rather spend 10 years down the pits, feeding my family, putting shoes on my kids, paying my bills and keeping a roof over our heads than risking it all on an e-bay store or trying to sell firewood to a guy that has a gas fire.
There are still some secure jobs, and my advice is, if you have a job, hang on to it for as long as you can.


So let me get this right. You sit at home watching a programme about other people make money, then go to work and help other people make money? The point I was trying to make is most just dream about being entrepreneurs whilst others do it.

It is a fact that there are many people in paid jobs that earn considerably more than a majority of the self employed but it's all about a state of mind and that won't be everyone's cup of tea. Many new businesses do fail, but how many people leave or get fired within a year of starting a new job?

Job security is a myth. There are no safe jobs in today's world. Even if the business remains, an employee can still be sacked or made redundant.

"If you have a job, hang on to it for as long as you can." Absolutely agree but IanC who started this thread says he only works part time so has an opportunity to devote time to other ideas. I say good luck to him.

IanC's question is rather a strange one really. "Any thoughts on going it alone?" You wouldn't be "going over to the dark side" you know. I should have thought that compared to what you have already achieved, starting a little sideline would be child's play really.


Who said life was going to be easy?

By Mintaka - 14 May 10 10:01 AM

IanC have you considered Amazon to advertise your products? I have no experience of selling on Amazon, but have just received some goods I ordered, and wasn't aware where they were being shipped from until they arrived by airmail from Hong Kong. It might get over the hurdle of being an "untrusted" website somewhere in Aisa where loads of spam comes from.

I've just been looking at www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00A6LNC7Q/. A bargain at a mere £1422 don't you think? Free shipping from China too.

Whether a product at this price would sell from Amazon, I couldn't say but at least they are a trusted platform to advertise goods. Involves minimal set up costs too.

From a tax point of view, I have no idea how your end works when exporting goods, but for goods imported into the UK from outside the EU, generally if are not gifts or are above a certain value there could be duty to pay. Check the HMRC website for more information.


Who said life was going to be easy?

By Mintaka - 14 May 10 10:01 AM

IanC said...
My items are gifts, for which I receive a gift of money in return.


Yeah right, nono this is how it works.

I dutifully part with £1400 for an exquisite Chinese painting, which you carefully wrap up and post off. The moment it arrives in the UK, someone in the employment of Her Majesty will scan through the paperwork and come across a form with information about an expensive gift from an Uncle IanC. Now being the suspicious person he is, he is having non of it especially as you sent one last week, so decides to slap a 20% import duty on my lovely painting. Now seeing you are not within reach of the bailiffs, guess who has to cough up the charge or live with an empty space on their wall?

I remember seeing the adverts for the "Jonny 7", but Father Christmas was too mean to give me one. Thanks for reminding me how it scarred my childhood. lol


Who said life was going to be easy?

By Ader1 - 1 Sep 11 2:36 PM

Of all the things I heard people export from Thailand, the strangest I think were 'Spirit Houses'. I think you'll know what I'm referring to IanC. I'm sure you've been to JatuJak (sp?) market. Some incredible stuff there.


"Everyone is guilty of something or has something to conceal. All one has to do is look hard enough to find what it is." - Solzhenitsyn

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM

Self-employment has been the only way for me. No CRBs or office gossip, just me an the wife (and my eldest now wanting a bigger role!). It has been tough, real tough at times with sleepless nights, no holidays, robbing Peter to feed Paul and so forth.


I've bypassed the 'hosting' issues by having an Ebay shop - yes you have to swallow the fees (which can be passed on to the customer anyway - shhh), but you don't have the hassle of maintaining your own site, which can take away many man hours.


It's worked for me, but I have a keen interest in the area I deal with and always have. It sometimes feels like I've turned a hobby into a job, but it's harder than that. Money is the only issue - income is not regular and comes in peaks and troughs, but you plan for it. Materials is not an issue at present as other traders are desperate for your business, so there are good deals to be made. However, this can then be reflected in the need to lower one's own prices depending on the economic picture. Anyway, I'm rambling.


I would encourage anyone to go self-employed. If you manage to make it work, the rewards can be great - not just the monetary rewards, but the psychological ones.



Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM




Q3 said...




There are still some secure jobs, and my advice is, if you have a job, hang on to it for as long as you can.


That's not really the argument. Of course there's jobs out there - there's also a long line of unemployed with no criminal record. There is a thread at the moment about someone who has lost 2 job opportunities due to having a record, despite him saying it was declared. So that is the issue. What do those with a record do if they keep getting knocked back?
 

There are 2 realistic ways - knowing someone who will give you a job, or going it alone. Even a 'proper' job is no guarantee these days, with the 'zero-hour' contracts, fixed length contracts, employers firing a whole workforce then forcing new contracts, big name stores going to the wall and so on. Job security today is the lowest it has been for a long, long time. Even once untouchable state jobs are disappearing.

 

My only real advice for self-employment is to choose an area that you know.


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM

I don't think this thread is about giving up a job more what do those with a conviction who have no job - what options do they have? The skills and talents one has can be applied to self-employment. Branson had the charm and persona, that was his skill.


 


Btw, Branson's dad was a barrister and his granddad was a 'right honourable' High Court judge - it always helps if you can fall back on money when starting up a business.


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM

smilewinkgrin 


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM




Q3 said...
And me Ian !

So, come on Foxtrot, why don't you share this really great e-bay business model with us ?

I am sure that there are many on here just chomping at the bit to give up the daily grind, their zero hour contracts, and low wages and sit in from of their PC's waiting for the orders to flood in.

You never know Rodney, by this time next year, you might just be a...

So you want me to provide a link to my ebay shop, showing my full name, address, phone number and email? Perhaps I should do it to dispel the 'Paul' myth.


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM




Q3 said...



I get a feeling that your telling porkies, because if this great idea was true, surely you would like to rub all our noses in your glory.

 

I somehow think that the answer is going to be blush">   or  mad  but come on Trotter prove us wrong.

 


What on earth is wrong with you? Is that PTSS kicking in or what? I really think you need to get off this forum and seriously consider your own mental health issues as they are clearly having an effect on your thought processes. That 'section leader' post or whatever is was certainly allows you plenty of time to float around the forum all day. Perhaps you could spend some of that time contacting the thousands of other Ebay shop owners and let them know how you feel.
 

I've never said I live a life of luxury, far from it, but it's enough to keep a roof over our heads, food on the table, clothes in the cupboard and petrol in the car. I've said there are peaks and troughs, but you plan for them - a good month doesn't mean a spending spree as you have to prepare for a bad month.

 

To me, it sounds like jealousy, made worse by underlying mental health issues, that lets you sit and snipe whilst others are trying to get on. Such a shame.


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM



Q3 said...



 

 

 

Q3 also said : "No need to provide details of your e-bay shop, just asking you to truthfully share a few of those super business ideas that you employ, that ensure that you and your family enjoy a life style that only a very few of us can, especially if we work for others can enjoy ".

 

So Mr Trotter, what's so secret you can't share this simple but very effective e-bay business idea with us ?.

 

You even have your family working with you now, its so so successful.  

 

Is this so called "business", supporting your weekly benefits payment ?, because you seem to be on here a lot also ?..

 

As for my job, well, I am now on 4 days paid leave, so plenty of time to hear from the master of e-bay.

 

No sniping here FT, just searching for the truth, so before you run to the headmaster, think about your answer. 

 

I am sure I am not the only one waiting to hear what you sell, if anything.

 

You really are an unstable fantasist aren't you? I don't even know where to begin with your increasingly bizarre posts. The continued changing of font styles is surely an indication of some sort of multiple personality disorder. The continued lip curling sniping from the boundaries is possibly some sort of inferiority complex.

 

Benefits? Certainly been there before, but at the moment it's just the usual tax credits available, which come in helpful. Mind you, even if I was earning 60k per year, I could still claim those. My wife does the admin side of the business, my eldest... well does what he can, but he's not really able to earn from it. But he's only 14, so he's got other things to worry about. I'm not quite sure what you want me to share with you - there's no big secret or master plan.

 

IanC... an to register for an ebay business requires no special costs - you just register with them as such. The only difference with regular ebay selling is that you need to adhere to additional distance selling rules, and if you envisage turning over more than 79k per year (which I think is the 2013 level), you need to register with the VAT-man. But the advice already given is sound - try as a private seller to start with.

 


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM



Q3 said...


 

In regards to VAT registration, please try and at least get your facts right. 


Some goods and services are exempt from VAT, such as insurance and finance, education and training, and charitable fund-raising events.


If all of the goods and services you sell are exempt, your business is exempt and you won't be able to register for VAT,


It's obvious that you feel  embarrassed by actually sharing any details about your " e-bay" business. 


We all know that  various agencies in the UK, check forum post's, in regards to certain activities. 


Regardless of registration for VAT, anybody that buys items and then re-sells them is responsible for paying tax on their profits.


Even dotNetBB  allows IP tracking, so good luck Rodney.



 

 

Hmmm... the font seems to be getting bigger - just waiting for the ones written in green crayon. Bit difficult to sell insurance and finance on ebay. Not quite sure what the comments about IP tracking is about, perhaps another paranoid episode? I declare any earnings - got no choice really with everything going through paypal. Fortunately I can use both my wife's and my tax thresholds - every little helps.

 

Now Q3, are you going to be a nice little soldier and stop trying to deflect from your own very obvious deficiencies, or are you going to continue to embarrass yourself with continued sh*t flinging from your cage? That's surely no way for a section leader to behave - don't forget the example you need to set to your team. Maybe you should take a double dose of the medication you're on tonight.

 

IanC... compromise? Where's the fun in that?


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM




Q3 said...
Still no mention of the type of business then ?...I guess that is a little secret, like may others, that will never be disclosed.

 

Going through some of your 625 posts, you seem fixated with "Sexual offences" and discussions on "Sex offenders".

 

Sorry mate, in hindsight, and bearing in mind your strange views and almost fetish type obsession, I don't think your really the type of person I want to talk to anymore. 

 

Good-Bye . 

 

 

Did the aliens leave in the anal probe Q3? Did you go up for seconds at the stupid counter? This really is getting so worrying. Why are you still browsing a forum at gone midnight, trawling through old posts? Are the special interest adult sites better at that time of night? Clearly your promotion to section leader is part of some curious experiment - perhaps to see how quickly you can stack the dented soup cans in your aisle or whether you can be trusted to use the mop.


It has become evident that your previous incarnation was not a real soldier, but perhaps playing with toy soldiers – or maybe even ‘Call of Duty’ on your X-Box. I would be concerned if you were allowed anywhere near a real firearm. One that fires bubbles is more your level and if you’re good, you may progress to one that fires a cork. Even Barry George has more credibility.


Still, hopefully your Mum will have your breakfast ready for you soon, all cut up into little soldiers (hey, perhaps that’s the soldiers you mean?!) She may have even crushed your pills up into your milk. Remember though, don’t stay up too late tonight otherwise the sandman won’t pay you a visit with more dreams of army-men, and maybe even a dream where you’re Batman.


“Bruce Wayne to clean up in aisle 2”


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM


IanC, without wanting to use the forum to give free advertising:


With Ebay, the buyer usually pays through Paypal which is effectively a clearing house – money gets sent from their Paypal account to yours in an instant transaction. The buyer doesn’t need a Paypal account as they can pay directly from their card via ebay. You’re free to accept other forms of payment if you wish, ie cheques, PO’s etc. In regards to shipping costs, you can either have the buyer pay this, or add this cost to your selling price.


Paypal charge you 3.4% + 20p in normal circumstances for each transaction, which they take immediately. Therefore if you sell something for £50, the cleared funds paid to you will be £48.10. Fees can be reduced slightly if your monthly turnover goes into higher thresholds. You can receive payments via what is generally known as a ‘Paypal Gift’ – you give the sender the email address linked to your Paypal account, and they simply transfer funds to you. There is no fee on this, but it’s not something you could use continually without raising concerns.


You can then withdraw funds from your Paypal account into your bank account. When you first set an account up, this can take up to 72 hours until you go past their ‘security’ period, which I think is about 4 weeks. After that, any withdrawals should cleared in your account within couple of hours, depending on the day and holidays. The fastest one I had was about 45 mins.


Be aware though, that once a transaction is complete, you will be able to see each other’s personal details – name, address, email etc. Obviously the seller needs this info to send the product, but the buyer will see yours too. This is the same for both private and business sellers.


There are other overheads with ebay such as listing fees and final valuation fees, which vary depending on the starting prices and selling category – the listing fees normally range from 10p to £1, with other options available, and the final valuation fee is normally 10% of the final price, but with a cap of £75 – if you sell something for £2000, the final fee will be £75 not £200. Private sellers can take advantage of ‘free listing weekend’ offers that crop up roughly every 2 weeks. Ebay invoice these charges once a month. As a business seller, it’s easy to pass these fees onto the buyer, ie if you are happy to accept £10 on an item, sell it for £11.50 – a little simplistic, but you get the drift.


If anyone really wants to know, the main thrust of my shop is vintage toys and collectables – well, 1960’s to 90’s if that’s classed as vintage – that have that nostalgic value. If that makes some people yawn, tough. As long as they sell, who am I to complain? I’ve got some lead toy soldiers available, but I can’t provide a link or a user-name as my name and address is there for any old nutter to see and abuse.


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Foxtrot - 6 Mar 12 8:26 PM




IanC said...

Memorabilia. I want my ‘Johnny 7’ back, the one my Mum bought me, mid 60’s, for failing my 11+. I know you’ve got it, the one with the white plastic bullets and grenade launcher! :-)  

I wish I did! You would easily pay £200+ for one of those.


Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

By Hobbit - 13 May 13 1:33 PM

Oh might add, it is a good idea to research online especially ebay/amazon biggest traders.

Don't forget ebay may already have many people selling your items online already and perhaps cheaper, always a good idea to check competition out while seeing there prices and stock and type.

opening up an ebay shop I hear is both simple and easy and everyone's protected under paypal and ebay. But this is not to stop you from opening a separate website and selling from there also, covering both angles would proof best in the long run for any business.

Perhaps Google your item you want to sell and see what comes up also.

Online businesses seem to be the best way to go, I have heard many people have even opened an account on youtube. There are many cases where girls have opened a beauty channel where they give tips on hair and style and use different products and review them, if there videos get accessed many times, it can lead to more hits and youtube or other companies may sponsor you. I have heard many people on youtube create a few videos per week and even after many years they are still getting 10p each time someone watches there video. It all adds up some get 100 some get 1k per month depends on how popular and how many sponsors you get.

There are many ideas out there, but as you always say once you find that niche you grab it and stick to it.
By Hobbit - 13 May 13 1:33 PM

Looks like everyone has gone self employed apart from myself Wink

I agree though its the products and then the rest is doable, ebay makes it possible.

I was reading how a woman in her 40s owns a ebay shop selling cheap 2nd hand laptops and netbooks and she works hard 7 days a week fixing and maintaining them and then selling them all year round and she then takes a good 2-3 weeks off each year and spends 2-3k on a holiday for 'adults' and that is without her husband Wink
By Hobbit - 13 May 13 1:33 PM

Its the right and only choice I think, more so considering the recession and high unemployment and no I do not believe any government figures on employment going down that simply means they put everyone on newdeal or a work scheme, same applies for recession figures.

Even high street shops and your local tesco and asdas no ones hiring full timers its all part timers and they will always want the cheapest ie 17 year old school leaver who can do an 8hr shift or 'more'

I think self employment is the key but finding an idea for a business that will work and survive is another thing all together, and most importantly self employment should not involve cultivating weed plants and stroking them before going to sleep.
By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


First of all, I do think self employment is an answer to many problems, but if it were that easy, everyone would be doing it. Apart from obviously finding the product, my aim is to advertise it to as many people as possible and one way I can think of to do that is to set up a webpage which is a minefield of registering domain names and contacting host providers and sifting through their ‘special offers’, add-ons and unwanted garbage.


I don’t want to let this develop into my own personal crusade and the forum isn’t for promoting my own business so I’m concentrating more on what people might sell, ways to do it, ways to advertise products and so on.


Thankfully, I work in an area that is relatively closed to the world and can obtain products unavailable elsewhere, or if they are, are only supplied through large companies with all their overheads. Well, actually I don’t know anyone else who exports them. I’m a one man band so to speak and certainly not a businessman and so I’m on a learning curve myself on this one. I specialize in handmade art products and my only aim is to publicize what I can offer, leaving the recipient to email me for quotes and further details.  


I’ve often been accused of ‘running away’ from the UK, pure luck and not ‘playing the game’ that so many remain trapped in. I simply believe the vast majority have the opportunities I have and I also believe that the more people get out and about, the more opportunities present themselves. Waiting for something to happen or change has never been on my agenda. I have plenty of free time in my job and I could spend it relaxing and sleeping, (or complaining), but choose to spend it sourcing works of art, building a website, which might or might not work. You know, if we all spent as much time thinking as we do complaining, I’m pretty sure we’d move ahead a lot faster.  :-)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:23:51 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM




Q3 said...
Check out : Free Webstore : FREE to list 15 items or less, and very easy to set up !

Check out : Freeparking : Domain Names from £9.99 each.

Thanks for that. I'll certainly check these out when I have a bit of time. Busy today with the dreaded immigration police just having come back from my holidays. Stadard stuff to report back in as an alien, but something that needs to be done. shakehead
By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:24:43 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM




Foxtrot said...

 Branson had the charm and persona, that was his skill.


 


A bit like me then lol
By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:25:04 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

Hi Ian, can you tell me who the hosting provider is ?.
 
Like all providers, there is of course good and very bad. If you give me some further details, I can have a look into if you so wish.
 
When you started using the host site, was their a little FTP (File Transfer) program that you had to download and put on your PC ?
 
In the legacy file, what type of files are stored in their, or can't you open up this file at all.
 
Ta.   
 
 


 

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


Q3


Done it! Finally figured out how to get the text on and now am reading up on how to upload the pictures, headers and graphics in general. I’d rather not say who the hosting company is, but believe me, they’re useless unless you keep paying, with lots of special offers and third party sales – and promises!


I have my own web designer program, complete with FTP up-loader, which is a copy off a friend here and the whole point of this is to do it for a minimum. If it works it works, if it doesn’t I lose peanuts but will have learned something new.


My outlay so far is less than 15 GBP for a domain name, hosting (1 year) and to set up an internet shop. If and when it’s up and running, I’ll spend some time doing my own SEO’s and perhaps write an article for those here on a limited income on how to set it all up, if there’s any interest?

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM


 

Post Edited (My I.P Address Finder) : 18/10/2013 17:25:40 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


Q3


That’s it, all up and running but in basic mode as I’m a bit busy. I’ll certainly keep that Youtube idea as a try out when I have more time. Now that the initial enthusiasm has worn off the self employment thing and everyone’s run off, I’ll let you know how it works out in time and if it’s a good idea and easily set up by the average bod like myself with no business experience. I just think that there has to be a point where people must actually try to do something and not wish for it to happen. Thanks again for the advice. :-)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

 


 

Post Edited (My I.P Address Finder) : 18/10/2013 17:25:59 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM




Q3 said...




 


"Ian, ironically with the way things are progressing in this digital age, creating an on-line presence can be achieved within hours."


Even minutes if you plead guilty! lol


AND


With the immortal words of the Greek god of sports ringing in your ears " JUST DO IT"  


Before someone else gets the same idea! smilewinkgrin


 


Well, we’ll see. My bread and butter is my work, this is a hobby and let’s see where it ends up. Early days yet. Good luck to those who also try. :-)


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

I suppose the interesting fact to that e-bay example is the postage cost's. Here we have an item, that is light, has a small postal size, and still costs nearly 25% of the retail price to receive.
e-bay, despite being a good proving ground, is a very competitive market place. No matter what product you sell, unless it is a "one off piece", or something really specialist, it will be sold by somebody else, and the prices can sometimes vary. You could find and established exporter from your country, with a tried and tested supply chain, selling the same example for a third of the price.   
 
In regards to postal systems throughout the world, we have never had problems with receiving goods from Europe, however we have been caught out with stuff from the USA and Australia.
 
The problems occur, when the sender, in whatever country is asked to list and value and type of goods on a local customs declaration form.
 
When the sender puts down the cost of the item and what it is, plus a little bit on top, UK customs, and no doubt customs elsewhere, pick up on the value, and charge an import charge accordingly.
 
We receive lots from HK and China, and now the Jiffy type mail bags are all printed the same. We can receive two or three different items all at various prices, and the labels will all say " Gift " and "Value $5.00".
 
I Can see your point on wanting to keep things small and simple, and selling to order.
 
I wish you good luck anyway Ian, as it sounds, despite your expressed lack of business acumen, a very interesting and profitable venture.  
       
    


 

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM

Q3


Can I ask you how much you pay for your hosting service? Ive met some real crazy companies out there with terrible reviews and mind boggling rates. :-)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

Hi Ian, sorry for the delay, just been picking up the pieces of some bloke called Richard !.

OK Down to business, I use the FREEWEBSTORE website format, you can upload and list and sell a maximum of 15 items for free.

Anything over 15 items will start costing you a monthly fee, as will including more bells and whistles.

The hosting, is through their site, so it is already set up. I imagine it's a bit like having a store within a store or a cyber concession, if that makes sense mate.

I can only explain it the way I see it. The hosting is free through their hosted website.

A lot of " Cloud" based opportunities are also out their.

I obtained a domain name through a company called Freeparking, but as you know their are thousands of companies selling sites.

I purchased my "business name", and paid my £9.00 for the 12 month registration period. You can more and have your name registered over a longer period.

Rather than use anything else, I used .co.uk because I am of course in the UK.

However, .com is a better but more expensive option in most instances.

When you set up your free webstore, you will have a generic webstore address, because your business is going through their site.

For example it might look like this : www.freewebstore/iansthaigifts./ 45678.com

Obviously that's not only a mouthful but does not look good from a corporative point of view.

There is a simple procedure on the webstore site to steer your domain address to the webstore address, a bit like creating another mail box outside your house, but using 49A - 49B - 49C for each room, they are still going to number 49, but being sub divided.

The search engines will then pick up your domain : ie : www.iansthaigifts.com and steer it towards www.freewebstore/iansthaigifts./45678.com

My advice is : Investigate through Google the term FREE webstores, try and look for something that is free to set up, that may have limited capabilities but will get you on line and selling, with the chance to expand at a later stage.

Secondly, look at getting your domain name purchased cheaply. Remember, less is more and be descriptive, but not overboard.

I have searched and as an example the following is available for $19.99 for 12 months : www.iansthaigifts.com - From Freeparking.com

Good Luck Ian.


 

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


Q3


Thanks for that and I’m already on the freewebstore site and that was easy to set up. I’ve already SEO’d my keywords.


Moving on, I already have a good descriptive domain name (www.xxxx.net) and a host provider. Unfortunately it’s a cheapy and don’t I know it! No service help, upgrade to even get them to speak to you and floods of third party offers! I uploaded using a website builder that I’ve had for ages and my files are all now in the legacy file folder in cpanel. Now what, how do I upload them onto my site? Their manual is a jumble of technical terms with no step by step instructions and it’s driving me bonkers. Anyone know?     

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

Hello Ian.

Can we clarify that you are at the following : https://www.freewebstore.org/website/index.html

The only problem I can see is as follows : 1. There is a conflict between the website building program, and maybe the type of files that you are trying to upload onto the FWS site.
I cannot really understand the concept of putting up HTML pre built site pages on to a site that has set pages, so must admit I am at a loss mate. Sorry.

I didn't go the upload route, I just followed the site details and put my 15 items on.

I tweeked about and spent a few days getting things just about right and it worked.

You can now try and contact the people at FWS at https://www.freewebstore.org/website/contact.asp, or try and glean some info from the help tutorials.

I personally would go right back to the beginning.

Forget the files that you have already written, just try and start putting your items on, via the set page route.

I know I haven't been much help, but I am sure that there will hopefully be somebody else on here that can maybe point you in the right direction.


 

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM



Q3


Ah yes, a misunderstanding. Yes, I’m on freewebstore and it all went well. A very easy site to build and up and running in a couple of hours. I’d recommend this to anyone because it’s totally free, no catches and so if people are thinking of selling something you can’t lose as there’s absolutely no outlay. That’s not advertising the place as such; it’s just saying that there are excellent and totally free internet shops out there for people wanting to go down that route.


Now I move on. Together with the shop I’m trying to build my own separate website with my own www.net domain name which is totally different and the hosting people I’m with are totally useless. So now I’m stuck at having my files in the host File manager legacy folder and am searching for ways to upload them onto the website. Can anyone give any step by step instructions? Where’s SouthernChap gone when I’m struggling, as he was knowledgeable about all this


Ader.


I’m not exporting from and I’m not in Thailand, but yes I know the spirit houses you mean. It’s a Buddhist thing; we have a little shrine in our house as well. I can’t think of anything the Thai’s make that you can export really as they don’t mass produce anything of value. Most of what they have comes from places like China, S.Korea and Taiwan, a bit like the west. What I’m saying is being in the right place to buy. If for instance you were to buy a Samsung mobile phone in the UK, you’d get it a lot cheaper from source in S.Korea where they’re made, than an importer in the UK or the U.S. and so would sell it on for a profit and it would still be cheaper than a shop bought one. A bit like the cheap cigarettes people bring back from their holidays and then sell them on to their workmates for a profit?

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


OK, I now know how it works. The difference is though that I have no stock levels. You look at the samples I offer, choose the type required, (colour, size, etc) and then contact me for further details. I then source it for you, or as near as possible and if you’re happy with the choice and price, away we go. That’s why it’s all down to advertising. When I said 50 GBP, that’s what I’d sell them for in Thailand; the western equivalent in the U.S and Australia would be nearer 180 GBP and that’s cheap compared to the commercial sites I’ve seen. I just figure if I put in the effort of carrying them back by plane, I might as well try selling to the west with a quick walk down to the post office and get a lot more?


Memorabilia. I want my ‘Johnny 7’ back, the one my Mum bought me, mid 60’s, for failing my 11+. I know you’ve got it, the one with the white plastic bullets and grenade launcher! :-)  

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

  yeah  Thanks Everyone
 


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 14:42:03 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM




Mintaka said...
I've just been looking at www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00A6LNC7Q/. A bargain at a mere £1422 don't you think? Free shipping from China too.



Yes Mintaka, I can probably get you one of those, or one very much like it. Mine is not the same but along those lines. Arty stuff that people are willing to pay rather huge amounts for. The Chinese try, but a lack of business knowledge and language leaves them at a distinct disadvantage. That’s the add on in being in out of the way places, people usually want what they can’t have and if you can get it . . . . . you’re quids in for very little effort. Beautiful works of art though and I suppose if they last a lifetime and people have the money, then fair enough.


My items are gifts, for which I receive a gift of money in return. I know that I pay a small percentage of the value in shipping as ‘Business tax’, but there are no further taxes at this end. I’m glad I’m not shipping from the UK end, it seems a nightmare of the tax people grabbing whatever they can.


A ‘Johnny 7’ at 200 GBP? I’d have asked her to buy half a dozen if I’d known. Err, my electric Hornby train set also went missing. Yes, people want nice things and memories and there are still people with money willing to pay. I think we can all learn from this and perhaps some will take it on board and start to develop ideas of what others want and they can supply?         

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


I’ve lost count of the number of gifts I’ve sent off over the years to various people. Now if it was bulk stuff, then yes. I’ve never had an import duty slapped on a single item yet. The UK isn’t the only country I’d export to, but what a horrible country when your own government continually tries to rob you.


Who knows, next they’ll have the police deciding if you’re a good driver or not and robbing you at the side of the road? nono I’ll sell it to you, but if your own government want to slap taxes on you there’s nothing I can do about it.      


I remember seeing the adverts for the "Jonny 7", but Father Christmas was too mean to give me one. Thanks for reminding me how it scarred my childhood.”


That bad eh? You could have mine, but unfortunately I lost it nearly 50 years ago. sad


It’s a wonder, from what I see on the news, that any of you can survive in the UK. I wonder how much of your wage goes into the government coffers? It must be a scary percentage. Local tax, salary tax, N.I, VAT, car tax, TV tax . . . . . it doesn’t happen here. You want to sell something, you sell it and to have acquired it in the first place someone has already paid tax on it. Anyway, fortunately UK tax laws don’t concern me – I’m an individual selling my property; a bit like you selling your TV or car, or look on it as a swop, an exchange. :-)   

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Chinese-HAND-PAINTED-Oil-Painting-on-Canvas-Lady-Chen-Yifei-74-1-/290961781719?pt=Art_Paintings&hash=item43beac73d7

$70 USD or £44.83 UKP. Shipping $18 USD From Japan ?

We receive items from HK and China, pre-printed customs forms either say " Sample" or "Gift".


 

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM




Q3 said...
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Chinese-HAND-PAINTED-Oil-Painting-on-Canvas-Lady-Chen-Yifei-74-1-/290961781719?pt=Art_Paintings&hash=item43beac73d7

$70 USD or £44.83 UKP. Shipping $18 USD From Japan ?

We receive items from HK and China, pre-printed customs forms either say " Sample" or "Gift".


That’s a bit cheap. Mine aren’t paintings though, but I list them as art for want of a description and by that I mean arts and crafts. I can’t see the customs problem with a ‘gift’, how many single gifts are sent round the world in any one day? I like the ‘No returns’ though. Buy it and if you don’t like it you shouldn’t have bought it. No 14 days approval or any of that on my stuff either; you get pictures by email and you choose.      

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM

Thanks. Well, I might give that ebay a try then and see what happens. UK Tax and VAT doesn't affect me here, only registered businesses pay it and you have to be a pretty big business at that. It's probably because the state doesn't need to subsidise the population, I don't know, but you just sell and that's it. They put business taxes on shipping though so I suppose that's one way they get money. My little site registers visitors, but I'll look into the SWOT thing.


Can't you two come to a compromise? :-)   

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:27:54 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

Still no mention of the type of business then ?...I guess that is a little secret, like may others, that will never be disclosed.
 
Going through some of your 625 posts, you seem fixated with "Sexual offences" and discussions on "Sex offenders".
 
Sorry mate, in hindsight, and bearing in mind your strange views and almost fetish type obsession, I don't think your really the type of person I want to talk to anymore. 
 
Good-Bye . 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM



Foxtrot said...

 

IanC... compromise? Where's the fun in that?


Well, it stops threads getting blocked? They don't tend to give many warnings nowadays.

I'm certain about sites being monitored though, especially the UK. Things move slowly, but they do catch you in the end. That's another thing I'm glad to be away from; value added tax. You make money and pay tax, then buy something that's already had tax paid on it - and then pay more VAT? Scandalous.

 

This Paypal; I've already registered. So what happens? Someone wants to buy something and how do they do it? Do I have to give my customer I.D that I recieved to them or put it on the site as a reference or something?    
By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:28:20 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


Q3


My product is art based. The good thing is it can only be got here unless you’re willing to pay astronomical sums to major companies to export. As I said, I tried it out in Thailand and found I can make upwards of 500% profit on each item and what I sell costs on average between 5 to 10 GBP for me to buy here, then probably another 10 GBP if I have to pay for shipping and insurance. What I pay out is pocket money and so there’s no re-investment needed. I have a couple of orders from word of mouth already once they’re seen, but its early days yet and that’s why I’m looking for a wider audience. My wife spent just spent a fiver buying one and it’s already been sold to someone in Bangkok for 51 GBP; she just has to carry it back as hand luggage on the plane next time we go back.


It’s a bit strange saying this, but I purposely don’t really want this thing to get too big. I’m aiming for the upper end of the market and so in effect I’ve already done my research and found what I have sells; it’s just that I want to bring it up to the level of a p/t job. I’ve no real business sense, it’s just that I happen to be in the right place to do all this and am working on instinct. I just know that 5 GBP sold at 50 GBP is worth building on.


Commissions are what I want to stay away from as far as possible. So far it’s cost me 13 GBP (and many hours on the computer) to set this up as I’m still on holiday and have plenty of time. That will change soon as I begin to teach and that always comes first. I’ve now got a website shop and will be building my own website when I have the time. If it works it works, if it doesn’t it’s been an experience and I’ve lost a measly 13 GBP and will continue with word of mouth sales.


Re compromise: It’s just that threads tend to get shut down if it gets too overheated. Everyone has their own way of doing things and I doubt I’ll go the ebay way if it’s based on a double commission, but others might find it works for high volume stuff? I’ve also dragged my wife into this – she benefits from what I make? She can get her finger out as well then and contribute! She can find the products, pack them and ship them and I’ll do the sales bit as she’s computer illiterate. We each play our part, but everyone has their own way of doing it. :-)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:25:21 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:25:45 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:26:04 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 5 Sep 10 3:02 AM


 Don’t know where to start really. I might be many things but a businessman I’m not and this is all new to me. I go off instinct and I know I’ve got access to a potential goldmine. However and there’s always lots of those involved; I can only continue as long as I’m in the country I’m in now. I have a fantastic contract, renewed annually, so I’m not prepared to give that up as it’s both a salary and the only reason I have access to what I have and if I end my contract and move on, or I become ill or whatever, my access ends with it. I also don’t want to re-join the rat race to tell the truth and that’s why even if it’s successful, it will always remain p/t.


I’ve seen one large company selling my exact product (each) for hundreds and occasionally thousands of pounds. Of course, they have a professionally set up internet shop, staff, support staff, website maintenance . . . my hosting and domain name cost me 13 GBP! What they have and I don’t is access to advertising and God alone knows what they spend to get near the top of google searches. SEO, (letting people know), that’s the important thing as it is with anyone selling anything, even their labour.


I don’t consider myself self employed, it’s a hobby that I’ve just sort of dropped into. It might or might not work depending on if I can get my product exposed to potential buyers. I’m already selling them in Thailand and if I can’t get the exposure I need I’ll just carry on doing that, but at a much lesser volume rate and price than I know they’ll go for on the internet.


I think I mentioned in one thread that people need to get out and about a bit more. I stuck my CV online a few years ago and got hundreds of offers in one week. My philosophy is someone somewhere wants what you’ve got to sell, or your skills – the problem is communicating with them and letting them know you’ve got what they want. If we could all have top notch exposure to google for one week, we’d be turning buyers (and employers) away by the thousands.


Ebay is OK, but I’ve looked and it’s at the bottom end of the market in terms of prices, a sort of bargain basement selling mass produced items. I had a quick look and according to their blurb, if you want to set up a business on Ebay you need to register as a business, with all the costs involved? Oh well, I’ll carry on building my website and no doubt ideas will come to me over the course of the next few weeks as I get back into teaching the first term lot again.

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:26:28 (GMT+1)

By Anonymous - 12 Apr 13 3:50 PM

.


 

Post Edited (Q3) : 17/08/2013 10:27:22 (GMT+1)